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Horton Technique: Vocabulary, Mechanics, Stressors, & Treatment

presented by Sheyi Ojofeitimi

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Disclosure Statement:

Financial - Sheyi Ojofeitimi receives compensation from MedBridge for the production of this course. She is a consultant to the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation. Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.

Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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With the recent popularity of dance reality shows, new dance studios seem to be popping up in every neighborhood, and PT clinics are seeing a steady increase in dance training as it is related to musculoskeletal injuries. While most therapists may be adept at treating the injuries, addressing the technique errors that cause the injuries may be a daunting task. This course will teach therapists how to identify and correct common errors in Horton, a modern dance technique. The information will be presented in lecture format with demonstrations of proper and improper alignment. Identification of the stressors and body regions affected most in the Horton technique is crucial to effective injury prevention and rehabilitation of dancers.

Meet Your Instructor

Sheyi Ojofeitimi, PT, DPT, OCS, CFMT, CIDN

Dr. Sheyi Ojofeitimi received her Bachelor's degree from Fordham University, Master's degree from West Virginia University, and Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Alabama State University. She is a Certified Functional Manual Therapist (CFMT), Orthopedic Clinical Specialist (OCS), and a graduate of the Dr. Linda Joy Lee International Connect Therapy Series, and is also trained in…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Introduction to Horton Technique

This chapter will review the history, vocabulary, and basic movements of the Horton technique, all of which are essential to understand when treating dancers who study this technique.

2. Body Mechanics: Comparison of Optimal vs. Non-Optimal Technique and Resulting Injuries

Comparisons of "optimal" technique as demonstrated by advanced Horton dancers to technique "errors" seen in beginner dancers will be used to illustrate common stressors. Complaints and injuries due to these technique errors will be discussed.

3. Injury Prevention and Treatment Strategies

Dance may look effortless, but it requires strength, endurance, and extreme flexibility. It also comes with high rates of injury. Overuse injuries, with mild to moderate severity, are the most common type, while technical errors are the most common cause of injuries in this population. Prevention is found to be most effective through holistic approaches, ideally involving screening, education, and technique correction, improving strength and flexibility and correcting postural faults. This chapter will address injury prevention and treatment strategies, including technique correction/retraining, strengthening, flexibility, and mobilization exercises for the dancer.

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