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Parent Child Interaction: Why Intervention Must Start Early

presented by Stacey Dusing

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Disclosure Statement:

Financial: Stacey Dusing receives compensation from MedBridge for this course. She has no other financial interests beyond the production of this courses.

Non-Financial: Stacey Dusing has no non-financial interests or relationships related to this course.

Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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Accreditation Check:
Infants born preterm or with a high risk of disabilities benefit from developmentally supportive interactions. Therapy alone cannot meet the needs of these infants without the support of parents to integrate supportive experiences into the infants’ daily routine. This course will present evidence on how parent-child interaction influences development and provide examples of how parents can be engaged to support learning and development. Parent and therapist collaboration can improve developmental outcomes, and it is important that the therapist understands their role in this process.

Meet Your Instructor

Stacey Dusing, PT, PhD, PCS

Dr. Dusing is a board certified pediatric physical therapy specialist with over 15 years of clinical and research experience with infants and children. Dr. Dusing is currently associate professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Virginia Commonwealth University where she directs the Motor Development Laboratory. Her research focuses on postural control, reaching development and…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Impact of Parent Child Interaction on Development in the First Year of Life

This chapter will introduce evidence for the significant impact of parent child interaction on development of cognition, language, and motor development in the first year of life. Supportive strategies will be exemplified.

2. Impact of Parent Child Interaction on Development of Infants Born Preterm

This section will exemplify how preterm birth alters the relationship between parent child interaction and development. Considerations for parent education in the neonatal intensive care and first year of life will be discussed.

3. How to Assess the Quality of Mother Child Interaction

This chapter will highlight tools which can be used to quantify parent child interaction during therapy sessions or play assessments.

4. Interventions that Utilize Parent Child Interaction to Improve Developmental Outcomes in at-risk Infants

This chapter will provide evidence for three intervention strategies including parent therapist collaboration.

More Courses in this Series

Implications of Cognitive and Motor Interactions for Intervention

Presented by Stacey Dusing, PT, PhD, PCS

Implications of Cognitive and Motor Interactions for Intervention

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
A large body of evidence suggests a tight coupling between motor and cognitive development. Yet physical therapy education often focuses only on motor development. This course will demonstrate the relationship between motor and cognitive skills in the first year of life and will introduce intervention strategies that can be used with infants and young children to enhance the integrated development of motor and cognitive skills. The application of theory to clinical examples will enhance learners’ ability to support motor and cognitive development.

View full course details

Variable and Adaptive Postural Control in the First Year of Life

Presented by Stacey Dusing, PT, PhD, PCS

Variable and Adaptive Postural Control in the First Year of Life

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
Variability is a key component of typical development. A lack of variability in development may be related to developmental delay. This course will describe the development of variable and adaptive postural control in typical development and in infants at high risk of disabilities. The role of early experience in development will be highlighted. The implication for assessment is highlighted.

View full course details

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